Fall 2014

Two tales of one city

Settlement, historic site provide different perspectives of Jamestown

Out & About the Chesapeake

Out & About the Chesapeake

Various Events and Activities around the the Chesapeake Bay for families and individuals.

Staff and Wire Reports
It’s all great!

It’s all great!

Come for the falls, then check out canal, trails, color

There is more than one way to see Great Falls and the great fall colors that encompass this natural marvel on the Potomac River.

Whitney Pipkin
The row less taken

The row less taken

Maps chart paddles on small Potomac creeks

Brent Walls is the Upper Potomac Riverkeeper, dedicated to helping people enjoy and protect the Potomac and the waters that flow into it.

He spends a lot of time outdoors, but he has also spent time inside a mall near Martinsburg, WV, staffing an information booth during a home show.

Lara Lutz
Deep, dark secret paradise

Deep, dark secret paradise

Pitts Creek’s paddle provides peace of mind

I’ve always favored sinuousity, the curve in the path, the bend in the river, the course less straightjacketed.

With Chesapeake creeks like the one we’re paddling today, it’s the meanders that give us marshes and beauty, infuse our travels with what philosopher George Santayana referenced in his 1896 classic, “The Sense of Beauty”: “at every turn reawakening with a variation, the sense of the previous position…such rhythms and harmonies are delightful.

Tom Horton
Ad for rainbarrel depot
Carved conundrums

Carved conundrums

New site touted for Susquehanna petroglyphs

In 1926, a team from the Maryland Academy of Sciences took a load of dynamite 10 miles up the Susquehanna River from Havre de Grace and blew up Indian Rock at Bald Friar’s Ford.

They did it to save a piece of history.

The rock, a mighty boulder nearly as big as an island and close to the river’s north bank, was one of the East Coast’s finest examples of American Indian petroglyphs.

Joel Dunn
Hop aboard history!

Hop aboard history!

Don’t miss this ferry good trip across the Wicomico

This summer, I decided to detour from the straight line of U.S. 13 on the way from Baltimore to Crisfield, MD. Instead of staying on the interstate, I remained on business Route 50 through Salisbury and made a right onto Nanticoke Road, then a left onto Whitehaven Road.

I meandered through stands of loblolly pines and past horses and pastures until the road ended at a river. Then, I waited two minutes for a boxy-looking boat to come across the river and pick me up.

Rona Kobell
Heavenly landscapes

Heavenly landscapes

Jesuit land at Newtowne Neck now MD state park

Newtowne Neck is one of those places where there is still far more land than people. The priests who settled here in 1668 came for just that reason.

The club-shaped peninsula of Newtowne Neck protrudes from the north shore of the Potomac River about six miles south of Leonardtown in St. Mary’s County, MD. It’s bounded on one side by Breton Bay and on the other by Saint Clements Bay, where English colonists arrived on the Ark and the Dove in 1634.

Lara Lutz
Two tales of one city

Two tales of one city

Settlement, historic site round out Jamestown’s story

The gates of the fort stood wide open. A cluster of hens scratched furiously through plant scraps near the foot of its weathered plank walls.

Inside, framed by the entrance, a young guard sat in a slice of shade against the nearest building. It was a warm day, but he wore breeches and stockings. His chest was layered in a long-sleeved linen shirt and heavy jerkin, crossed by a leather strap loaded with wooden flasks that carried gunpowder. If he leaned forward too far, his metal helmet gleamed in the sun.

Lara Lutz
Wings over the Water

Wings over the Water

Conowingo’s popularity soars with bald eagles

The best place to see eagles on the East Coast is not at a wildlife refuge, not in the wilderness of a forest or the remoteness of a rural corner.

The best place to see eagles is next to the Conowingo Dam, an enormous, 53-gate structure spanning the Susquehanna River about 5 miles below the Pennsylvania border.

Rona Kobell
When the Chesapeake restoration effort began, scientists and policymakers raised red flags on the problem: continued rapid growth could easily counter any potential gains from ecological improvements. Twenty-five years later, the clean-up effort lags and the topic of growth receives little serious engagement. Even those who express concern about the true costs of growth tend to accept it as unavoidable reality, treating growth as an unquestioned force of nature that must be “accommodated.” Questioning traditional concepts of growth is avoided among political leaders and environmental groups, and little is taught or discussed in the region’s academic institutions. This makes it critical to re-examine concepts of growth, or the acclaimed bay’s restoration — and quality of life in the region — may be jeopardized.

Spring 2014